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A Day in the Life of a Social Media Manager

By JD Rucker on Feb 15, 2011

While dealers have been paying attention to social media for a couple of years now, it hasn't been until recently that the effort and investment has been put into hiring employees directly engaged in the field. It has been pushed off on Internet managers, sales people, and occasionally college-bound children of owners and general managers (more often than you probably know).

This infographic design by our friends at SocialCast puts the job into perspective in a way that will hopefully shed some light on what a full-time social manager's day looks like. We don't necessarily have to understand what it is that they're doing, but we definitely need to know that there is a distinct ROI involved.

When done right, there is.

Social Media Manager

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