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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
Hey - It’s time to join the thousands of other dealer professionals on DrivingSales. Create an account so you can get full access to the articles, discussions and people that are shaping the future of the automotive industry.
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Dennis Galbraith

Dennis Galbraith Chief Marketing Officer

Exclusive Blog Posts

Predicting Your Next Buyer

Predicting Your Next Buyer

Trying to understand who your best target customers are can be a painfully long, and expensive, process that can result in thousands of wasted marketing do…

Why Dogs are Not Good at Math

Why Dogs are Not Good at Math

Dogs are Man’s best friend.  They get excited when we come home, they want to hang out with us, run along a path, and play fetch.  When we …

Are You Paying For Out of Market Clicks?

Are You Paying For Out of Market Clicks?

I first have to give a shout out to my buddy Jason Stum who helped me identify a leak in our adwords budget. Once I started to dig in a bit more, I was …

What I Learned About Sales From the Olympics (& Dealer Pros)

What I Learned About Sales From the Olympics (& Dealer Pros)

We really can learn a lot from the Olympics, from perseverance to mosquito control. But sales advice? Funny you should ask.  One of my colleagu…

Start Contacting Customers When They’ll Respond

Start Contacting Customers When They’ll Respond

Today’s socially connected consumers have changed the tide in the automotive industry, from top to bottom. However, the dealership must also chan…

Big Data To Make Selling Cars a More Rewarding Job

Big Data will change the way salespeople interact with shoppers in the store. Eric Miltsch does a great job every morning of providing this community with a top-ten list of internet news items. Today he served up a particularly good article from the New York Times about the way data is now being captured in brick and mortar stores, like Nordstrom. As this technology goes down in price and up in value, dealers will be able to utilize it in stores as well. 

We can learn a lot about our future from fight between big-box retailer and ecommerce sites. Most retailers have a split between online and in-store sales that is at least 80% to 20% one way or the other, and many of their shoppers are not combining the two prior to purchase. In our business, well over over 90% of the sales are made in the store and roughly 90% of all sales are to shoppers who use both the internet and the physical store before they buy.

We are never going to be the earlier adopters of retail methods for collecting data, in the store or online. However, we have an opportunity to tie the two together like no other retail industry. We still intercept out customers in the store with a human. So we can do more than hit them with an e-coupon at the right time, we can ask them the right question and match them to the right vehicle, financing, service contract, etc..

All this needs to be automated. And several vendors are working in that direction. The future for people inside the store is not so much about collecting data or analyzing it as utilizing the benefits of it in the conversations they already have with consumers. Knowing what questions will change the entire nature of the frontline salesperson in a way that is more successful and more enjoyable.

Dennis Galbraith
I friend of mine just responded to me with a link to an article on how Big Data is being used to stop suicide among veterans, http://www.fastcolabs.com/3014191/this-may-be-the-most-vital-use-of-big-data-weve-ever-seen This is a great example of data that is changing human conversations. These models are not perfect. They are not going to lead to an email telling someone they are about to take their own life. They are going to lead to a question coming from a human, the right question or questions at the right time in enough cases to save lives. The same will be true for enhancing quality of life within the showroom.
Eric Miltsch
Dennis - this activity is definitely coming, and it may even arrive sooner than we think in the form of intelligent sites that are able to read our behavioral data before we arrive to a website. Imagine the website pulling in your desktop or mobile history, or even your social graph (Facebook) or knowledge graph (Google) to provide you with the content you're most interested in seeing without having to search for anything - it's already there. Better experience, more accurate information and improved performance. That's what I see...
Paul Rushing
The biggest problem you have with all of this "big data" is exactly what is pointed out in the article about Nordstrom's. Consumers are opting out from being tracked and it's negatively impacting consumers perceptions of businesses that use and collect the data. We as an industry are at a tipping point. We need to dial in what we have before adding more confusion to the mix!! http://www.drivingsales.com/blogs/iMagicLab/2013/07/12/how-will-sell-cars
Mat Koenig
Thanks Dennis, I believe that it is important that we understand "big data" and more important, how we can use that information to shift our everyday interaction with consumers. I think Google and Nielsen did a good job in March of sharing some info on how the mobile consumer is interacting and the relevance between their online (mobile) engagement to their in-store purchases http://www.google.com/think/research-studies/creating-moments-that-matter.html Thanks again for sharing the post and I look forward to having you on our weekly Hangout on Air next week to discuss the vendor ratings system you have here at drivingsales. Be sure to share the link so others can watch our conversation live! http://koing.co/hangoutsonair
Mat Koenig
Apologies everyone, my fat fingers did a typo. The correct address for the weekly hangout is http://konig.co/hangoutsonair Thank you very much to Paul Rushing for the heads up :)

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