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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Allan Cooper

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Exclusive Blog Posts

2017 Presidents Club Insights - Patrick McMullen

2017 Presidents Club Insights - Patrick McMullen

Listen to what Patrick McMullen from MAXDigital has to say about the future of automotive, what dealers can do today to prepare, and how DrivingSales Presi…

Five Tips for Selling Used or Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles

Five Tips for Selling Used or Certified Pre-Owned Vehicles

Selling used or certified pre-owned vehicles can be daunting task. With prices, laws, and competition varying across the country selling a pre-owned car fo…

What Motivates Your Employees to Perform?

What Motivates Your Employees to Perform?

Sorting through resumes, you find applicants who show potential. There are some with experience to walk on the job and set your service department abla…

How to Recruit the Best Talent for Your Dealership

How to Recruit the Best Talent for Your Dealership

Employee turnover can cost a dealership approximately $400,000 per year through lost sales, service offerings, new hire search, and training expenses even …

2017 Presidents Club Insights - Mark Brown

2017 Presidents Club Insights - Mark Brown

Hear from Mark Brown, sales director at Grappone Auto, about what he thinks is coming for the auto industry, how dealers can prepare, and how the DrivingSa…

As mentioned previously, training and resources can potentially lead employees to leave companies as they increase in value. This tendency can be nipped in the bud with a little caution during the hiring process. If companies take care to hire teachable employees with a propensity to commit, and take the time create a favorable impression from the start, they will find that an investment in those employees will be very low risk. Many of a company’s attrition issues are determined during the very early stages of their relationship with new employees. A study by Ipsos-Reid claims some 30% of employees plan to leave their job within two years. But, Corning Glass, the specialty glass and ceramics giant, found that employees who enjoyed a positive orientation to the company were 70% more likely to remain at their job for at least three years. Employee retention starts with the interview. Choose your employees based on attitude and ability to learn. Be sure to continually give them the tools they need to succeed. Entrust them with some semblance of autonomy, the ability to participate in company wide decisions and opportunity to expand their skill sets, and kiss high employee attrition good-bye.

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