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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Anne Fleming

Anne Fleming President & Car Buying Advocate

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Poor Service Review? How it's Handled is Key to Your Success

694b70962bda7e59a85a23787d3bd64d.jpg?t=1So, you’ve received a poor review from a woman customer. Now what? First, remember poor reviews will happen. Someone will be unhappy with your dealership at some time. The same happens to Starbucks, Apple and Nordstrom. As long as the poor reviews are infrequent, they really are good news. Why?

 

  1. Customers expect to see a variety of ratings when reading reviews. If all are “exceptional”, customers will think they aren’t seeing the whole picture.
     
  2. You have a chance to correct the issue. Your dissatisfied customer could have not mentioned the problem and just told her friends. Instead, she took the time to tell you about it, and now you have a chance to work on it – and most importantly, the relationship
     
  3. It allows other women prospects to see the entire thread and see the larger picture as well as understand how you respond and treat customers.
     

The key issue for any ‘poor review’ is how you handle it. Here are a few things to consider:
 

  1. Use rating services that allows this type of feedback to be held offline until you have a chance to resolve the problem. (Certified Dealers on Women-Drivers.com allows 10 working days for customer resolution before posting the review.)
     
  2. Carefully read and note the real issue. Determine if it's a problem you need to address internally. Don’t dismiss it or think it is a one-time problem.
     
  3. Discuss the problem in a prompt manner with your customer. Be sure to thank her for the feedback and make sure she has been “heard and gotten.” Once the issue is firmly resolved, you may consider:

    a. Offer a service coupon and ask her to give you a chance to make up for the inconvenience.

    b. A follow up call from the Service Advisor or even the GM provides an appreciative touch.

    c. Free car washes or lunch for two can be in order.
     
  4. Resolve the issue internally, even if it was a one-time problem. If one customer reported the issue, other customers may have experienced the same thing.
     
  5. Ask the customer if they are willing to re-write another review based upon this issue being resolved to their satisfaction.

 

 

Did You Know?

Customers who leave a bad review have taken the time to tell you about it rather than just walking her business elsewhere. View this as an opportunity rather than a threat and reap the rewards. Customer retention and recognizing the residual revenue in the service drive is paramount. Keeping a customer costs a lot less than getting a new one.

Carey Fried
I like your approach Anne. I totally agree that bad reviews are opportunities. I also know that some negative reviews are unjustified and sometimes you have to just let them go. In a perfect world ppl would be open to feedback and constructive criticism and willing to grow from mistakes and failure. Now ppl seem afraid of mistakes and getting caught.
Clint Jones
I am a little bit confused by the "woman", "she", and "Women-Drivers.com". A review is a review, good bad or indifferent. Are you trying to say that a review from a female customer is to be handled differently? Is there a secret formula for handling women and their interpretation of their sales or service experience? We sell roughly 65% of our vehicles to women. The way that I see it, the secret to doing business with women is to treat them like every other customer...with respect. By the way, I hate the hold time on reviews. If we screw up, we screw up. We have in the past and will in the future. It is part of being human. It isn't that we don't care about our customers, it is that there are a lot of variables within a vehicle transaction and there are rare occasions when we drop the ball. If I am going to leave a review, I am going to leave it in a place that I feel it can not and will not be manipulated.
Trish Rowsell
I agree with Clint, why should it matter if the customer is male or female?

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