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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Bill Playford

Bill Playford Vice President

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A Win is Not a Win

It occurs to me regularly that many times we are rewarded in the life for things that we may or may not deserve. We slip into a close parking spot after someone just drove by it. We get pulled over for speeding and avoid a ticket. We use gambling winnings to pay down debt. In many situations we can do everything wrong, but in the end, we still receive a reward for our actions.

I equate this activity to the way airlines treat air travel. When you boil it down, the airline's job in the equation is to get you to a destination (it doesn't have to even be the one on your ticket), alive and unscathed. It doesn't matter when you get there, or even how you get there. Wherever "there" may be, if you make it, the airline chalks up a W.

What happens to you, personally, physically, or emotionally, doesn't really matter in the equation. If you have to wait three hours longer than intended to board the plane, it doesn't matter. If they run out of water on the flight, it doesn't matter. If your connection is cancelled, requiring a day or more of layover, it doesn't matter. If your luggage is lost, it doesn't matter. If you have a nervous breakdown on the flight, as long as you don't appear to be a threat, it doesn't matter. As long as the plane takes off and touches down without disintegrating in the process, the airline chalks up a W. The passenger chalks up an L.

This same scenario, albeit less dramatic, takes places every day at car dealerships around the nation. Despite dropping the ball repeatedly throughout the entire sales process, if a vehicle (any vehicle) rolls over the curb, it's a W. Like the airline passenger, it doesn't matter how the customer was treated, how many members of the staff they had to talk to, how much money was lost throughout negotiation, how many "promises" had to be made throughout hours of back-and-forth, if a transaction was made, sales people are slapping high-fives and exchanging back pats.

I refer to this is as "just get 'em in" syndrome. By the simple act of convincing a potential client to come down to the dealership, if the collective effort of the dealership sells them a car, it is somehow a victory, no matter the pretenses. "Just get 'em in" syndrome has been stunting the growth of Internet operations since day one.

For many, the initial draw of the Internet side of the business is the precision of the numbers, and the perceived scalability of operations. Unlike walk-in traffic, demand can be predicted, and even supplemented if need be, to maintain a relatively steady stream of interested parties. Advertising sources are plentiful, and direct actions can be attributed to impressions. Every month's activities can be broken down and analyzed to look for deviations in patterns. It has always been imagined to be a sales machine.

If an Internet sales strategy is executed properly, it should act as a sales machine. However, with all of the capabilities the Internet has to augment any dealer's business, like a machine, it's only as precise as the quality of its components. If a machine is working properly, it repeats the desired results, over and over, with little deviation in quality. When the individual parts inside the machine begin to fail, the repetition of desired results begins to fail. Some consider maintenance vital, and proactively fix or replace components to preserve precision. Some use duct tape and a magic marker to mask results. Some use bonus miles to apologize for rude flight attendants. Some just get them in the door.

If your dealership truly wants to be successful on the Internet, it should stop focusing on the final destination or the end product, and instead focus on what it takes to get there. If you're thinking in terms of machines, think about all of the actions it takes to create a perfect widget. Think of all of the precise measurements, the wear and tear on tooling, and the sequence of inputs workers have to make. If everything falls within spec, you have successful results day-in and day-out.

If you're thinking in terms of air travel, think about a free entrance to the Platinum Club. Then, think about a free upgrade to first class, an on-time departure, and an early arrival. When you deboard the plane, the senior pilot then offers you a sincere thanks, and a firm handshake. Think about everything going better than expected. As a passenger, everything went the way you wanted it. For once,  it's you who gets to chalk up the W.

Bryan Armstrong
Holy crap! I LOVE this. The joy should be in the pursuit. As a matter of fact some of the biggest "W's" I count are when you cannot make a deal and the customer thanks you, sends in a referral and then 6 mos. to a year later DOES buy. I know where to get inventory, customer's are a finite and valuable resource.
Tim Jennings
Love it. Process should be a machine spitting out the same desired nd result every time. Second best article as ever read. The best 1 had to be want joes ;)
Bryan Armstrong
Tim- Ha! I think they're related...
Chris Costner
Very good analogy. I see internet departments with the "just get em in" syndrome and also see departments that go for a true WIN. Process is key and there is an entire second half of play to go once the client arrives. I agree with Bill and let's give them all the free Platinum Club entrance. Great post.
Bill Playford
Thanks guys!

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