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Jared Hamilton
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Brian Cox

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Is Having Too Many Pictures A Bad Thing? Perhaps

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It wasn’t too long ago that we saw most dealers’ VDP pages contain only a couple of pictures of a vehicle. As technology improved and made it easier and more efficient for dealers to take and upload more images, best practices quickly raised the standard for image quantity to 40 or more pictures. Now, however, a recent article in Automotive News cites a white paper that suggests that a VDP page that contains more than 9 photos causes “image fatigue” in a consumer. Apparently this results in a drop off in lead volume as consumers get tired of clicking through multiple images to find the information they are seeking – whether that be interior images, exterior images, or whatever aspect may be important to that particular buyer.

 

The thought process behind providing multiple images is that the consumer has the ability to inspect a vehicle online and gain more interest by having any questions about vehicle condition answered. The results of the white paper suggest that the optimal number of photos on any given VDP is nine. According to the report, used vehicles posted for sale with nine images generated 50 percent more leads than those without any images; 56 percent more leads than those with 20 images; and 71 percent more than those with 30 images.

 

Why does it seem like best practices have gone backwards?

 

My take on that it is this: It’s easy to see how today’s online car shoppers can get image fatigue by clicking 40 pictures, one by one. That being said, I don’t think it’s any less important for shoppers to be able to obtain the information they need without experiencing the “image fatigue” suggested by the white paper.

 

It’s actually a very easy solution… video.

 

At the time it became a best practice for dealerships to have 40+ pictures, video marketing was in its infancy. Many inventory videos were crude and looked unprofessional. As technology has improved tremendously, video has become the media type of choice, as stated by many research studies. And not just in the automotive industry, but in every sector.

 

So, perhaps consumers tend to lose interest after clicking on too many images. Or, perhaps the real reason they lose interest is that the dealer didn’t provide the type of content that would keep a consumer’s interest, the one that is preferred by most demographics, the one that converts and sells cars… video.

Megan Barto
I really don't know if I believe this "Image Fatigue" thing - if I'm on amazon.com looking at an item, and I'm sick of looking at pictures, I simply move on. Interesting facts none the less. Thanks for sharing!
Jason Stum
To me it's the quality of the pictures, not the quantity. If you have a used car and can accurately tell it's story with 9-12 pictures then by all means do it. Once you get past the 20+ image mark are you really adding value to the VDP? Seeing the left and right side view mirrors, the cup holders, the glovebox, etc. probably doesn't sway a shoppers opinion one way or the other.

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