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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Bryant Gibby

Bryant Gibby Used car manager

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    We have had a problem with marriage that has created quite a bit of controversy lately at our dealership.  I'm not referring to marriage between a husband and wife, I'm referring to marriage between 2 sales consultants.

 

I'll start with a definition.  Being "married" on a deal is when 2 sales consultants are working the same deal together.  It is pointless to tie up 2 guys with 1 deal so one of the guys will go take another customer while the other guy continues to work the deal.  If the guy who took a new customer sells a car he would give up half of that deal to the guy that continued to work the original deal, regardless of the outcome of the original deal. Hopefully you guys followed all that. I read it 3 times to make sure it made sense!

 

Anyway, we have never had any sort of a rule regarding this marriage clause at our dealership.  It is only been a problem lately because we hired a couple of guys that have worked at other dealerships who have had that rule.  The problem we have now is that every salesperson thinks it is the best rule in the world.

 

Here's my stance.  I see the logic behind why 2 salespeople would want to make that agreement having sold cars in the past myself.  However, I think they are trying to cheat the system and get paid for work that they didn't even do.  They shouldn't be compensated for a deal that they didn't work with a customer they didn't even meet.  Also, I think we need to have a definitive rule because if we give our sales guys an inch, they will take a mile.  The other reason I am against this marriage clause is because I believe everything will work out in the long run when you average every deal out.  Meaning, a salesperson will definitely get screwed if he gets stuck working a crappy deal and the other guy on the deal goes and gets someone to lay down and buy.  But he can be on the good side of that deal in the future and according to the law of averages, everything should work out and be equal.

 

I may be completely in left field on this one, but I feel good about the decision we made as a management team.  The reason I wanted to write a post about this issue is because we have had lots of resistance from our guys when we made our decision.  Have you guys had issues with this at your dealerships, and if so, how have you handled it?

Mike Sheehy
This is an interesting situation. I have never heard of this type of arrangement, and I’m not sure why there would be two sales consultants for one deal in the first place. As a customer, I would be slightly offended if a sales consultant left in the middle of a deal. I understand where you’re coming from, but I still don’t understand why someone would split a deal with another consultant that had nothing to do with the new deal. Hopefully, we can get another side of the story when someone comments here. -Mike J&L Marketing, Inc. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Louisville-KY/JL-Marketing-Inc/31166092696#!
Bart Wilson
I know you need concrete rules when discussing splits. I understand that logic. But I am a firm believer that you want as few rules as possible and use the CRM as the judge. Its another way to make sure salespeople are utilizing the CRM properly. With all of the gray area, marriages included, I preferred to let the salespeople sort it out. What comes around goes around.
Dave Erickson
I think the marriage works if there are a few rules: 1. No hello t.o.'s. (must at least have test driven the customer). No test drive then no half deal. 2. if you're working a deal and an appointment comes in you turn the deal you're working and work your appointment. You keep your entire deal on the appointment but get a half deal on the deal you turned and the appointment must have been logged.
Jared Hamilton
Im generally against marrage split deals. It complicates the issue and anytime there are split deal fights you lose focus and momentium on the showroom floor. I do like what dave had to say, "No test drive, no half deal." Create as little rules as possible, enforce them ALWAYS, use the CRM as a bible then spend all your time build a culture of teamwork and customer satisfaction. Often if there are fights over split deals there are greater attitude problems with the sales person in questions. Sales people are the most important people on your team. Actually, that IS your team. Let them know where they stand and protect the team first....
Jared Hamilton
Im generally against marrage split deals. It complicates the issue and anytime there are split deal fights you lose focus and momentium on the showroom floor. I do like what dave had to say, "No test drive, no half deal." Create as little rules as possible, enforce them ALWAYS, use the CRM as a bible then spend all your time build a culture of teamwork and customer satisfaction. Often if there are fights over split deals there are greater attitude problems with the sales person in questions. Sales people are the most important people on your team. Actually, that IS your team. Let them know where they stand and protect the team first....

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