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Bryant Gibby

Bryant Gibby Used car manager

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    So I am pretty new at this whole management thing and am struggling with one of our new sales guys. He does so many things right and so many things wrong that I don't even know where to start. I'll do a quick list of his pros and cons so you guys can see what I am dealing with!

 

     Pros: 1-  He sells a lot of cars and will probably lead the board almost every month this year.  2-  He is a very likeable guy about 60% of the time.

 

     Cons:  1- He is very argumentative with managers when he doesn't get his way 2- He is confrontational with sales guys and has earned a pretty bad rep with most of them 3- He refuses to do any Ford certification testing that we require 4- He forgets things almost as quick as you tell them to him 5- He magically disappears any time that there is any lot work to be done ( lining cars, parking PDI's, locking up, etc) 6- He misses morning training meetings fairly regularly, he isn't very punctual, and he leaves for 1-2 hours randomly during his shift.

 

     Anyway, there are so many things that I don't like about the guy due to the fact that I try to run a pretty tight ship but he also is a likeable, funny guy who can outsell anyone else on the floor.  My predicament is deciding what to do with a guy like him. Anytime I try to tell him what to do he gets mad and defensive and doesn't really care what I have to say for the most part.  I don't want to be too rude to him in fear that he will blow up and quit and I don't want to lose a 15 car guy. With that said, he needs to be held to the same standard as the rest of the sales guys and I know it is my job to make sure that happens.  I need to figure out a way to get him to be more of a team player in a way where I don't piss him off. Any suggestions?

Richard Valenta
That's a tough one Bryant. His strenghts are he sells alot of cars. That's a good to have in the car business. However, you have some serious issues that you have to deal with. Maybe find a way to capitalize on his strengths while working helping him with his weaknesses in a non-confrontational way. Start with a sit-down "one on one" and get his perpspective on things. On the other hand, if he left, you could very well find that the rest of the staff would sell more cars combined because he is spoiling the whole bunch.
Mike DeCecco
If it was me, I would sit him down and if you don't see immediate progress, launch him... Maybe you'll get lucky and he'll quit. I agree with Richard that the other guys would pick up the slack. The dealership sells cars... not just this one guy. They would also feel that you are making a judgment call that the group is more important than one person. That will only increase morale for the other sales guys and send a message that they are just as important as him. Start with the sit-down and let him know that no matter how many cars he sells, he's still part of the team and has to do everything else the others are. Also, if he's so good and wants to move his way up the ranks someday, he's going to have to man-up and do some things he may not want to. Just because a star player makes the big play in the big games, that doesn't mean he doesn't have to practice, do two-a-days, know the plays, and work hard just like everyone else. That's my two cents.
Bart Wilson
There may be a reason he is a "new" sales guy. Someone with those skills probably hasn't played nice with others at the dealerships he used to work. I agree with @Mike. There definitely needs to be a sit-down. While a little preferential treatment can be awarded because of his performance, if you aren't careful you may lose credibility with your other salespeople.
Richard Valenta
@Mike Good comment. Championships are never won when the star has his own agenda.
Bryant Gibby
Thanks for the insight guys. I don't know why it so hard for me to let go of a guy that is selling a bunch of cars. I agree I need to look at the big picture and make sure the entire team succeeds and not just this one guy. I'll start working him a little for now!

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