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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Ed Brooks

Ed Brooks Automotive Digital Marketer

Exclusive Blog Posts

Take me off the List!

Take me off the List!

      The last thing a dealer wants to hear is “take me off of your marketing list.” Each and every time you get th…

Using Vehicle Safety Features to Drive New and Used Car Sales

Using Vehicle Safety Features to Drive New and Used Car Sales

Selling a consumer a large ticket item like a car, truck, or SUV comes with a degree of understandable skepticism for the buyer. Consider the importanc…

Why Branding Your Price is a Great Idea!

Why Branding Your Price is a Great Idea!

If you’ve been reading my pieces for the last few months, you’ve probably noticed how passionate I am about branding. By branding every aspect of your …

Interview With Ken Kupchik, Sales Humor Creator

Interview With Ken Kupchik, Sales Humor Creator

Last month, the was our top blog. So we decided to interview Sales Humor creator Ken Kupchik to get learn more about his successful social media platforms,…

Is Your VDP Your MVP?

Is Your VDP Your MVP?

The vehicle display page (VDP) is often the last page a customer sees before contacting a dealer. By the time they’ve arrived there, they’ve li…

Why “Transparency” is Just Like Hard-Core Porn

Writing a decision in a 1964 Supreme Court pornography case, Justice Potter Stewart wrote that some things are hard to put into words, hard to accurately define – and this is especially true of abstract ideas. So Stewart wrote one of the most famous phrases in court history “…I know it when I see it”. It’s interesting to note, that Stewart went on to say that the film in question was not hard-core pornography. I think it is often easier to define what an abstract idea is not, than what it is.

I’m often asked what my definition of my transparency is. Like Justice Stewart, it’s easier to say what it is not than what it is. A recent post of mine sparked some healthy discussion including this comment from a reader pitching a lead gen scheme, “I’m a big proponent of transparency but I don’t agree in giving up price without something in return…” How can a dealer say they’re transparent when they won’t share their price with customer unless and until the customer forks over their personal details? It’s hard to define “transparency”, but I know it when I see it, and the practice involved in this scenario is not that.

I’m hard pressed to think of any other sector, in this day and age, that won’t readily give a price to a prospective customer. I know dealers are eager to “harvest” contact info, but I firmly believe that dealers that are more transparent in their pricing generate much more interest and sell more cars – and have happier customers.

This is just one of the ‘wants’ that Will McGinnis wrote in his recent post; “Price – This includes not having to fill out a form for price.”

So in conclusion, transparency is hard to define – just like hard-core pornography – but I know it when I see it. And like porn, it can become addictive.

Jeff Collins
I know a great article when I see one!
Megan Barto
Only Ed would make this reference. But great post nonetheless! :-)
Ed Brooks
I referenced a VERY famous quote from court history ;-) Thank you very much!
Robert Niven
Why is a name and an email or phone number too much to ask? If you'd like a price I can certainly provide it for you with your fake name, fake phone number and dummy pricing email account. That's definitely transparent.
Theron Gammell
Imagine selling your house and refusing to divulge an asking price unless you got all their contact info.

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