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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Grant Gooley

Grant Gooley Marketing Director

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Shop - 'til - They - Drop!!

As I take my first steps in car sales I am beginning to learn some things the hard way, very quickly.

People like to shop, we know this. Especially with a the second biggest purchase they will ever make, a car. Shopping around from dealership to dealership is the best way to find out who is, not only going to give you the best deal but who is, going to be the most friendly and helpful.  I have learned a key aspect to car shoppers that might help you from running into the same hardship I have with a few of my first customers.

After you have the customer in a position where the value is built and the product has been explained, your getting into the stages where its time to close up the deal....or not. The customer is excited and wants to hear what kind of deal you can make them. As an excited sales person you go to the manager with information on the vehicle you have found. Your manager prints off a proposal with numbers. Off you go to the customer, proposal in hand, "good news!" you say to the customer. "I have payment that will work for you" you show him the proposal, stated on the paper is all the information including the fees, taxes, cash incentives etc. The customer takes the paper and says "thank-you, ill be back". Guess what, you have just given that customer a piece of paper that they will use as ammunition while they go from dealership to dealership and SHOP-TIL-THEY-DROP.  While you provide information to a customer about the vehicle its up to the customer to provide information to you about themselves. Same goes with the close. When its time to make a deal you need the commitment from them before you spill ALL the marbles. When the customer starts to "wheel and deal" thats a perfect time to ask for a commitment. Once you get the commitment, well you will do everything you can to get them the best deal you can. If they just want to know your best deal so they can go to the next dealership and shop them too, it doesn't seem very fair. You work hard provide them what they wanted, customer service, great deal for value and a car that fits their needs and wants, now its up to them to provide you with a commitment.

In closing, use your judgement as to what the customer is up to and if they are just going to shop 'til they drop, if thats the case don't spill the marbles. Get a commitment.

Jared Hamilton
Grant - welcome to the car business. Its a challenging but super rewarding industry. You are correct about the need to build rapport, give customers what they want but still get a commitment from the to buy. Its a challenging balance. I feel the most important step of the sale is the fact finding or needs analysis. Your most important task is to understand their needs and wants so you can provide solutions. Keep up the good work and keep sharing your experiences. Were here and excited to support you.
Arnold Tijerina
Are you saying you believe you should NOT give the customer the figures they are requesting if they ask but won't give you a commitment?
Ed Brooks
Grant - The number of dealers a customer actually visits in person, as opposed to online has dropped to an average of under two. You need to have the mindset that they have researched cars and dealers and want to buy from you! The vast majority of customers no longer want to shop 'til they drop. They've shopped on the internet and they show up when they are ready to buy. There's nothing wrong at all with saying, "I understand this is a big decision, but can you let me know why you're still hesitant?"
Rob Fontano
You shouldn't try to paint a customer into a corner with the old "up-front contract" "Is there anything other than price..." whether they say yes or no, you are at a disadvantage. It is best to ask good valuable questions while demonstrating the vehicle. Questions that demonstrate that you truly care about the customers’ needs. Then you tailor your presentation to those needs. You may need to slow down a bit when you get inside. There is no need to rush off to the desk and get the numbers. Take a few minutes, tell the story about the store and yourself, continue to build rapport. Show the customer some competitive comparisons online, etc. You mentioned being an excited sales person, there is a difference between enthusiasm and excitement. You excitement may be coming across as urgency, and sending the wrong message. If you are finding an inordinate number of people ask for a copy right after you present numbers, chances are you are missing something along the way that could easily be solved by asking better questions.
Grant Gooley
Thanks everyone for your great insight! Rob you made a great point.. Excitement can be mistaken as urgency. This makes a lot of sense. I appreciate the welcome into the car biz everyone and ill keep posting forsure :)

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