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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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JD Rucker

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Exclusive Blog Posts

Women in the Dealer Workforce: Where We Are & Where We Can Go

Women in the Dealer Workforce: Where We Are & Where We Can Go

It’s no secret that women make up a small portion of the dealer workforce and turnover among women is high. By not attracting and retaining women in the …

Car Subscriptions - Q and A with Bill Playford

Car Subscriptions - Q and A with Bill Playford

I had the chance to interview Bill Playford about car subscription services, and how they're going to change the marketplace. Take a look what this ins…

Be The Exception

Be The Exception

How brilliant marketers find and follow what makes their stories different in a world full of average content DrivingSales is excited to announce th…

Keeping Up with the Joneses in Quick Lube

Keeping Up with the Joneses in Quick Lube

More than half of all sales customers will abandon your dealership’s service department in the first year. It’s a widely varying statistic &nda…

It Has Never Been Easier To Be Average

It Has Never Been Easier To Be Average

It has never been easier to be average. This post was written by Jay Acunzo, who will be speaking at the upcoming DrivingSales Executive Summit in Octob…

100-115 Characters: The Sweet Spot for Getting Retweets

Best Tweet Length

When you want to get some pretty good data on using social media for marketing, one of the best people to turn to is Dan Zarrella, Hubspot's social media scientist. "Mad scientist" may be a better phrase for him, but he's crazy like a fox when it comes to Twitter.

This latest round of insights comes in the form of how to get retweets. Size is important as can be seen in the graph above. What's the right size? 100-115 characters appears to be the sweet spot. This can be attributed to a few things. First, longer Tweets can be retweeted the standard way, but when they're manually retweeted (such as "RT @0boy...) then the longer Tweets can't work as well. More importantly, people know that they will not be as easily able to be retweeted themselves if the Tweet is too long.

Another reason for this is quality of content. With the limited space in Twitter, it's hard to say things that are profound, funny, or generally retweet-worthy until you get into the longer format.

Lastly, tweets of this range seem to look better. They may or may not include a link. Whether they do or do not, they appear very nicely in Twitter apps and in the stream in a way that is psychologically appealing. It may sound simplistic, but shorter tweets seem too short and longer tweets turn people off for the reason given above.

At any rate, this data is compiled from a data set of 1.4 million randomly selected Tweets. It's as comprehensive as they come. One thing that should be noted: the length of the Tweet is infinitely less important than the engagement of the account itself. If nobody's listening to you, no measure of science is going to get you more retweets.

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