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Joey Little

Joey Little Vice President of Social Strategy

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I rarely meet a Twitter user who doesn’t want more followers. A few argue that the numbers aren’t important. They are only concerned with “quality followers.” I’m not sure it is either/or, but I notice that most of the people making this argument have very few followers.

 

Why would you want more followers? Three reasons:

  1. More followers provide social authority. Like any other ranking system, the higher your follower count, the more people assume you are an expert—or at least someone interesting. It may not be valid, but it’s the way it works in a world where there is a ranked list for everything.
  2. More followers extend your influence. Twitter is a great tool for spreading ideas. If you have ideas worth sharing, why wouldn’t you want to spread them to as many people as possible? Twitter makes it ridiculously easy. The larger your follower count, the faster your ideas spread.
  3. More followers lead to more sales. You’re likely on Twitter for one of three reasons: to be entertained, to network with others, or to sell your stuff. Whether it’s a new or pre-owned, service, or even a cause, more followers provide the opportunity to generate more leads and more conversions.

 

So how can you get more followers? Follow these steps for better Twitter usage and increase your followers:

  1. Show your face. Make sure that you have uploaded a photo to your Twitter profile. I will not follow anyone without a photo. Why? Because the absence of a photo tells me they are either a spammer or a newbie. Use a good headshot.
  2. Create an interesting bio. Don’t leave this blank. It is one of the first things potential followers review. Explain who you are and what you do. If you were a brand or a product (crass, I know), what would be your tagline? Include that in your bio. Also, be sure to include a city name. By the way, Twitter will not include you in search results unless you fill out your username, full name, and bio.
  3. Make your Twitter presence visible. I can’t tell you how often I have read an interesting post and wanted to tweet the link, but couldn’t find the author’s Twitter username. So I gave up and moved on. Make it easy for people to follow you. Display links to your Twitter account in your email signature, your blog or website, business cards—everywhere.
  4. Share valuable content. This is probably my most important piece of advice. Point people to helpful resources. Be generous. Be inspiring. Use lots of links. Create content that other people look forward to getting and want to pass on to their own followers. 
  5. Post frequently, but don’t flood your followers. I do most of my blog reading early in the morning. I scan over 30 blogs, and love to share the gems I find. I used to do this as I found them, which often meant a flood of 8–10 posts at a time. Now, I use HootSuite to spread these throughout the day, so I don’t overwhelm my followers.
  6. Keep your posts short enough to retweet. Retweets are the only to get noticed by people who don’t follow you. Therefore, you must make it easy for your followers to retweet you. Keep your tweets short enough for people to add the RT symbol and your username (“RT @LittleJoeAtVin”). For me, that takes up 17 characters, including the space. That means my tweets can be no longer than 123 characters (140–17=123).
  7. Reply to others publicly. I used to reply to people via DM, thinking my message was irrelevant to most of my followers. Because I wasn’t replying in public, this made me look unsociable. So now, I reply almost exclusively in public. The only people who see those messages are those who follow both me and the person I am replying to—a small subset of my followers. So, it’s sociable but not annoying.
  8. Practice strategic following. By this I mean, follow people in the auto industry, people who use certain keywords in their bio, or even people who follow the people you follow. Some of these will follow you back. If they retweet you, it will introduce you to their followers. For example, I could use Twitter’s Advanced Search Feature to find everyone within a 50-mile radius of Kansas City who has used the word “automotive” in their bio or a post.
  9. Be generous in linking and retweeting others. Twitter fosters a culture of sharing. The more you link to others, the more people will reciprocate. And that’s precisely what must happen for you to grow your follower count. You need others to introduce you to their followers. 
  10. Avoid too much promotion. Yes, you can promote your blog posts, products, etc. on Twitter but be careful. There’s an invisible line you must not cross. If you do, you look like a spammer—or just clueless. Not only will you not get additional followers, you will wear out your existing followers and many of them will unfollow you. 
  11. Don’t use an auto-responder. Do not set up an auto responder to send a DM to thank someone for following you. Its tacky and a bad practice. 

 

 

 

Joe Little

Social Media Marketing Manager

@LittleJoeAtVin

VinSolutions.com

Office: 800.980.7488 X199

 

Taken from: http://michaelhyatt.com/12-ways-to-get-more-twitter-followers.html

Kathi Kruse
Great Post Joe. I especially like #8. Twitter Search is awesome for networking. Now that they've enhanced it, it's crazy NOT strategize around it.
Jim Bell
Great tips Joe! The one thing that I learned just recently that you brought up is that not everyone will see that public reply unless you are following both. That is one thing that I think that twitter never really made clear to users.
Kathi Kruse
Great point Jim! I have one quick thing to add regarding #7: Because Twitter only looks at the first character of a tweet, you can turn a private tweet into a public tweet by simply adding any character in front of the “@” symbol. Most peeps us a "."

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