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Keith Shetterly

Keith Shetterly Owner

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Zen and The Art of The Shot Glass

 

I’ve often asserted that a shot glass is the perfect gift for both the pessimist and the optimist, as it is never half empty or half full!  It’s a “Zen” point, to me, as the statement generates an opportunity for clarity amongst disparity and confusion—because, if shot glasses are used properly, they are always a full gulp taken, or a full gulp declined.  They have no middle ground to argue about, no viewpoint of half-way down or half-way up, no half-way back or half-way ahead.  You are either taking the shot or you are not.  And that’s another Zen point about shot glasses:  They clearly represent a spiritual step in the act of taking the full shot.

And that’s commitment—It either is or isn’t; it’s either made or not.  Commitment is then the “Shot Glass of Life”, and yet so often we hedge our bets on that shot.  We try to sip it, or we try to wait it, or deny it, or talk around it.  Think about it.  A full and successful life has no half shots in it, nor does it allow half shots to last.

Is someone engaged without a wedding date?  They’re trying to take a half shot.  Are they afraid to talk to someone about hard things because they might lose them?  They’re trying to take a half shot.  Are they trying to hold out for more money at work by not working as hard?  They’re trying to take a half shot.

And a full and successful life, as I wrote above, doesn’t allow that.  Even committing to the full shot doesn’t guarantee success—however, the Zen point is that, in attempting to take only those half shots, from the beginning of raising that glass then a person has already accepted failure as an option.  And they’ve planned for it, even.  And so, guess what?  They eventually fail.

A full shot taken is a guarantee only of commitment to success; a half-shot attempted is a guarantee of failure.  Because, in the Zen, the spiritual commitment to oneself and one’s life is not made in the half-shot.

So, take full shots of life, and you’ll have the best success.  And you’ll never have to listen to pessimists nor optimists, just to the sweet feeling from the Zen of your own settled spirit.

Commitment is not half-lost or half-attempted.  And so neither is success from Zen and the Art of The Shot Glass.  To life –

 

Drink up!

 

By Keith Shetterly, keithshetterly@gmail.com
Copyright 2012  All Rights Reserved
www.keithshetterly.com

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