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From: Jared Hamilton
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Ketty Colom

Ketty Colom Digital Marketing Specialist

Exclusive Blog Posts

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How to Respond to Negative Reviews

We’ve all come across it, a negative review. It’s almost like a scarlet letter. You know it’s around but you really don’t want to address it. That’s probably the worse thing you could do, so the question remains--how do you respond to a negative review?


 

 

  1. Find out their story
    1. Take the time to get to the bottom of the customer’s complaint or issue
  2. Reply Promptly under the original review
    1. By doing this, you can also help minimize damage from other potential customers being swayed by the reviewer’s experience. Future customers will see that you care about your customers and actively work to improve your business.
  3. Be sincere and not defensive
    1. Sometimes, “I’m sorry,” can go a long way, as well as thanking the customer for sharing and taking the time to share their concerns.
  4. Have the Owner or Manager reply to the review
    1. Identify yourself and your position, include specifics of their complaints and any ways you’re going to fix the issue. Also give a good email address and/or phone number that customer can reach you directly.
  5. What if the customer’s review is inaccurate?
    1. Carefully and factually respond to the customer with your dealership’s side of the story. However, don’t be defensive. You could only make the situation worse by defending your dealership’s actions too strongly.
  6. What do I do with this information after everything is said and done?
    1. Determine if this issue is brought up often or if it is just a one time occurrence (which means you must be tracking customer complaints/issues).  If your business consistently receives feedback that your front desk staff is unfriendly, then you should take prompt action to fix the situation. However, if 99 percent of your reviews comment on your friendly staff and one customer who had a negative experience complains about it, then it may be an isolated issue.



Dealer Take Away
By noticing patterns and addressing the concerns to improve your guest’s experience, you will be on the right path to bringing new customers to your door and having previous customers return.

Jim Bell
Thanks for the sharing of tips Ketty. One thing that I see occasionally is dealers getting in a pissing match online. That is about the worst thing you can do. Take it offline when there is a problem. That is what we have seen to be most effective.
Cassie Allinger
Apparently I'm not the only one thinking about online reviews this week! (bit.ly/VJ1y0h) I believe that we typically spend too much time obsessing over reviews - as businesses and as consumers - and urge people to take a step back and think. Aside from that, reviews aren't going away any time soon so it's important that dealers know how to handle them, and that's where your tips come in! Very nice job ( and timing :) ).
Glenn Pasch
Ketty, great stuff I agree. Take it offline quickly. Do not get into a discussion of specifics online. A quick thank you or a quick "I would love to discuss this with you" works wonders. If I can help in any way, let me know
Ketty Colom
If I saw a "pissing" match online, I wouldn't want to go to that establishment. I always look up business reviews before deciding to purchase an item or service. My co-worker didn't do this for a dentist and he was told that he had 9 cavities, needed a root canal, etc. He came back to the office and looked up the reviews for this dentist and they all said the same thing. So he got a second opinion he only had 1 cavity and didn't need that dental surgery.
Bryan Armstrong
The most frustrating thing for me is when I'm precluded by privacy laws to just say "you didn't qualify for the advertised payment due to your sub-par credit". Though you may be right in all your actions, you'll still lose trying to explain or justify actions online. Showing a willingness to address the concern directly with the consumer offline and thanking them for the feedback IMO has proven to be the best course.

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