Notifications & Messages

Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
Hey - It’s time to join the thousands of other dealer professionals on DrivingSales. Create an account so you can get full access to the articles, discussions and people that are shaping the future of the automotive industry.
×
Megan Barto

Megan Barto Finance Manager

Exclusive Blog Posts

The Q1 Inventory Glut - Expert Insight

The Q1 Inventory Glut - Expert Insight

You've heard about it, read about it, and probably experienced it. Q1 for the auto industry was a pretty rough one. Experts are diving into what the pr…

Online Reviews Drive Customers to Your Dealership

Online Reviews Drive Customers to Your Dealership

We’ve been in the business of reviews for quite some time now – 15 years to be exact.  As DealerRater has grown, so has the power and infl…

Devising a Perfect Landing Page

Devising a Perfect Landing Page

When your business is taken online, you have to make sure your website is generating customers and visitors. This is one of the most important things in on…

Why Writing Down Sales Goals Inspires Action

Why Writing Down Sales Goals Inspires Action

As you're considering your business plans for the upcoming year, you may have decided that you want to start setting larger goals for your business. In…

Most Valuable Insight WINNER - Ian Curickshank

Most Valuable Insight WINNER - Ian Curickshank

How well does dealership VDP engagement correlate to car sales? What do you measure your online marketing on? I'm sure lead form submissions are…

How important is a job title?

Many of you might have noticed - I've been hanging out on here in DrivingSales for a while.  A few months ago, I changed the required "Title" to "Sales Catalyst" - now? What does that mean?  Do I help my store sell cars? Absolutely.

But doesn't my detailer also? Doesn't my technichian?  Yep.  Without a doubt.

I changed my "title" to this to prove that a title doesn't mean anything.  I can sha7f2f215162e9df5c897bd32f1f5c2f44.jpg?t=1re my knowledge and information without a title attached to my name.

I have the same philosophy at my store.  My business cards don't have a title on them.  Nor does my e-mail signature.

Funny story - I had a customer walk into the showroom - before they did just about anything else, they asked "What's your title here?" Why did they ask this?  Good question. My response "I don't have one - I've been with the company for over 7 years - I'm here to help you.  I don't feel as though a title is important. I'm not better than anyone else in this dealership. We're a team here - and I'm here to help you however I can. What is it that you need? I'd be happy to help - and if I can't help - I'd be happy to get you to the person who can help." 

My dealership firmly believes in a culture of *teamwork* - and by not having a title - I can be the utility player on the team.

They were blown away. 

Yes - they ended up purchasing a car from us (BONUS!!)

But my point is - the fact that I didn't have a title didn't sway my customers.  But then again - why should it?

What do you think? Do you think titles are more important to the customers or to the salespeople?

Grant Gooley
Megan, this is AWESOME! Lately I have been studying the power of "WHY". And it's truly a powerful word. For all of the reasons you outlined here. I'll explain; A title is a "what". Really who cares "what" you are, we should care "why" you're doing it. You mentioned teamwork and helping people. That is your "why". In turn, you sold a car because you let the customer know "Why" you were there and not "what" you were labeled as.
Justin Rhoane
Great post! I have two schools of thought on this. 1. I agree that titles can be somewhat of jumble when it comes to what you are really trying to provide as a business person. Internally titles can sometimes cause feelings of animosity. The main goal should be the customer and providing the best experience through teamwork, regardless of title. 2. However, titles are sometimes needed by some customers to feel important. They also can open doors that unfortunately are closed to lesser titles sometimes. I like your point and the conversation it starts!
Megan Barto
Grant - thanks, buddy! :-) Justin - being a girl (yes, I threw that in there) and sitting in the middle of the showroom, a few customers think of me as the Receptionist - they quickly come to find out that's not the case. I disagree - I don't rely on a title to "Open doors" For me - I rely on my knowledge, personality & 'charming good looks' :-P
Mark Winters
Titles cut both ways. In the dealership world the organization is built upon titles and responsibilities. This has trickled down to the customers. They have been programed to respond to the title of the person at the dealership. Take a frustrated customer who doesn't seem to be getting satisfaction from there service writer. When the service manager appears they can say the same thing as the service writer and the customer responds in a positive way. The same with the sales floor, The words "let me get my manager" will bring a sale more often than not. So is having a dealership without titles worthwhile? It all depends on how the customer reacts. Megan, in your situation of teamwork if a customer needs to talk to the owner do they get to? Are you all empowered the same as he is? I think that the only way a dealership could function in the eyes of the customer is that if everyone was an owner with the same empowerment.
Cathy Nesbit
Megan, Great points! Having a team work culture is a great way to maximize all aspects of business. It's good for the customer & the bottom line.

 Unlock all of the community & features  Join Now