Notifications & Messages

Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
Hey - It’s time to join the thousands of other dealer professionals on DrivingSales. Create an account so you can get full access to the articles, discussions and people that are shaping the future of the automotive industry.
×
Michael Esposito

Michael Esposito President

Exclusive Blog Posts

How SEO Impacts the Service Department

How SEO Impacts the Service Department

Digital marketing in the dealership often is viewed and conducted solely from a sales perspective. But the service department, often called the "backb…

What 89% of salespeople are failing to do...

What 89% of salespeople are failing to do...

  According to Dale Carnegie only 11% of salespeople ask for referrals. We all know how valuable referrals are but when it comes time to ask for a …

Why Your Online Shoppers Don’t Take the Bait

Why Your Online Shoppers Don’t Take the Bait

You think you’re dangling an enticing lure in front of your customers’ eyes. You plan to set the hook and reel them in. But what you don&rs…

Click-to-Call [Infographic]

Click-to-Call [Infographic]

  Most dealers understand the importance of making it easy for customers and prospects to find contact information. Websites often have prominent &…

Quick Tips for Improving Dealership Culture

Quick Tips for Improving Dealership Culture

Car dealers have a terrible reputation. It's such a negative experience for so many that people are electing to make a major purchase like a vehicle fr…

Overwhelmed by Technology Choices at NADA? Here’s All You Need to Know.

We spoke with hundreds of dealers at the recent NADA Convention & Expo in Orlando. One of the recurring conversations at our booth was that many dealers are overwhelmed by all the technology available. From CRMs to reputation management to implementing new technologies in the service drive, how do you know where to begin? What’s most important? What’s really going to add to your bottom line and what’s going to be a waste of money?

 

I read a book many years ago that provided what is one of the best answers I’ve ever heard to these questions. In Jim Collins’ “Good to Great…Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t,” he outlines a simple rule for companies regarding technology.

 

Technology should not be purchased as a solution to something that doesn’t exist. Technology should only be purchased if it will help you improve a process that is already currently in place.

 

Take CRMs for example. Years ago salespeople used pen and paper as a CRM. They wrote down customers’ names and addresses and notes, they sent out follow up letters, they sent out vehicle purchase anniversary cards and they called customers. Today of course the tools are different; you can swipe a drivers’ license and send out a text or e-mail. But the point is, a CRM isn’t going to do that for you. If your salespeople aren’t currently following process, you could potentially waste thousands of dollars a month on a CRM that isn’t going to help you. Same with a brand new website guaranteed to double your leads: ask yourself how well are you converting your current leads?

 

Another big theme at NADA was technology in the service drive. There’s a huge demand from dealers for features like mobile solutions and auto dispatch that can improve efficiencies & boost profits. Yet many service departments are not following basic processes that will help customer retention. Here’s one example:

 

When was the last time you went to a dentist? The day before your appointment you probably received a phone call or e-mail reminder from the dentist. Then, when your cleaning was finished and you went to check out, the assistant said something like, “you’re due back in six months, would you like to schedule your appointment now?”

 

I would venture to guess that most service departments, despite being eager to implement new technologies, are not doing these two basic customer retention techniques on a consistent basis: appointment reminders and scheduling the next appointment before a customer leaves—yet these two techniques don’t require any technology at all!

So when you are considering which of the new technologies to purchase and implement in your dealership, ask yourself these questions: what are we currently doing? Why isn’t it effective? Is it a process problem, a people problem or a technology problem? If you are 100% certain that your processes are in place, your people are doing what they’re supposed to be doing, and a new technology will make it easier for them and improve results, then by all means, go ahead and buy.

 

How do you make decisions on whether to purchase new technologies? What was the most interesting or exciting new technology you saw at NADA?

 Unlock all of the community & features  Join Now