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From: Jared Hamilton
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Nathalie Godoy

Nathalie Godoy Director | Consumer Marketing

Exclusive Blog Posts

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Car Subscriptions - Q and A with Bill Playford

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Search Engine Marketing Budget

There are many reasons that paid search ads won't show up on Google.  One of the most obvious reasons that people still struggle with is a small search engine marketing budget.  In general, a very small budget will result in ads being difficult to find when searched. However, there are ways to optimize what little advertising dollars might be available.

A low search engine marketing budget often finds itself eaten through within a short time every day.  One way to stretch these dollars is through the practice of day parting.  AdWords allows an advertiser to only show their ads during certain parts of the day.  After running the campaign for a while, some insight can be gained from the traffic and conversion data, and optimal days and times can be assessed.  Then it's simply a matter of "day-parting" the low-budget campaign to only show ads when they appear to be most effective.

High-search volume keywords can often eat through a small search engine marketing budget.  Long tail keywords, while not as frequently searched, can show higher buyer intent.  Generally, these are a safer bet than generic keywords for those who don't have a lot to spend on advertising.  They will get searched less and will drum up less expense, while often times delivering a more willing shopper.  Utilizing exact, phrase and modified broad match terms can help ensure that searchers are only costing advertising dollars on clicks when they search a phrase with high buyer intent.

Finally, relevance between the keywords, ads and landing page can change the effectiveness of a search engine marketing budget.  Higher relevance generally leads to a higher quality score, which often results in lower costs per click.  The lower the cost per click, the more clicks an advertiser can fit into their daily budget.  Search engine marketers should pay special attention to making sure that all items in the campaign are aligned for optimal relevance, and thus lower overall costs.

There are a few ways to make the most of a search engine marketing budget at any level.  What are some tips you all have for low budget SEM campaigns?

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