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Rebecca Ward

Rebecca Ward Marketing Writer

Exclusive Blog Posts

Must-See NADA 100 Expo Displays for Fixed Ops

Must-See NADA 100 Expo Displays for Fixed Ops

New Orleans is ramping up for the 100th anniversary of NADA, and the convention promises to be outstanding. You’ll be entertained at the NADA100 Carn…

Why Social Media Marketers Won’t Replace Your Sales Team

Why Social Media Marketers Won’t Replace Your Sales Team

Social media is changing the marketing profession in remarkable ways. According to the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), the social media analyti…

How To Find A Reliable Auto Body Repair Shop

How To Find A Reliable Auto Body Repair Shop

Finding a reliable and professional auto body repair shop is not as easy as it sounds. Unfortunately not every mechanic or auto repair shop will have your …

The Gap In Email Success - Part 3

The Gap In Email Success - Part 3

Yes Lifecycle Marketing recently released a study about gaps in email marketing. Check out the other parts of the series here: Part 1, Part 2. &n…

Are Remote Workers Happier Than Office Employees?

Are Remote Workers Happier Than Office Employees?

Here are some interesting insights about remote employees vs. office employees. I know many positions within a dealership don't have the option of remo…

FMLA: Defining Sons and Daughters

When deciding if FMLA is the appropriate leave, employers should consider the interpretation of “son“ or “daughter” issued by the Department of Labor under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  The Administrator’s interpretation gives employees, who care for a child, parental rights to family leave regardless of the legal or biological relationship. The “son” or “daughter” being defined is under Section 101(12) of the FMLA as it applies to an employee standing “in loco parentis” to a child.

The Administrator’s interpretation was issued by Nancy J. Leppink, deputy administrator of the department’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD).  The following examples of in loco parentis” were provided in the interpretation.

  • An uncle or aunt caring for their young niece or nephew whose parent is on active military duty.
  • A grandparent who assumes responsibility for their ill grandchild when their own child is debilitated.
  • An employee who intends to share in the parenting of a child with his or her same sex partner and wants to bond with that child.

For more information on leave laws download a copy of the free KPA webinar “How to Solve the Riddle of Employee Leave Law”.

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