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Rebecca Ward

Rebecca Ward Marketing Writer

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OSHA Issues Guidance on Temporary Worker Injury Documentation

221f12847e3d737b4f1341e256f16c38.jpg?t=1OSHA regulation requires dealers to document when your own employee is injured on the job, but what happens if your temporary worker is injured? When you employ a temporary worker, both the staffing agency that supplies them, and you, the host employer, are responsible for them.

How does this play into recording temporary worker injuries? To clarify this situation, OSHA has issued guidance on who is responsible for documenting temporary worker injuries.  In regards to injury and illness record keeping, OSHA state that injuries and illnesses should be recorded in only one employer’s OSHA 300 log, most often the host employers’ log.

The role of who is responsible for recordkeeping is largely determined by who is supervising the temporary employee. Employers must record any injuries and illness of any employee that they supervise on a day-to-day basis. OSHA states that supervising is defined as “the details, means, methods, and processes by which the work is to be accomplished.” This means that the employer who controls the conditions that present potential hazards and directs the actions surrounding those hazards is the supervisor responsible for logging injuries and illnesses, which is most often the host employer.

Additionally, OSHA also requires that information about temporary injuries and illnesses must be shared between the host employer and temporary worker’s staffing agency. This communication should focus upon eliminating work place hazards and supplying training to prevent future injuries.

To learn more about OSHA’s temporary worker injury and illness reporting guidance, visit https://www.osha.gov/temp_workers/OSHA_TWI_Bulletin.pdf.

Do you have further questions about maintaining OSHA 300 logs? Contact your KPA engineer or info@kpaonline.com.

 

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