Notifications & Messages

Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
Hey - It’s time to join the thousands of other dealer professionals on DrivingSales. Create an account so you can get full access to the articles, discussions and people that are shaping the future of the automotive industry.
×
sara callahan

sara callahan Owner/President

Exclusive Blog Posts

Keeping Up with the Joneses in Quick Lube

Keeping Up with the Joneses in Quick Lube

More than half of all sales customers will abandon your dealership’s service department in the first year. It’s a widely varying statistic &nda…

It Has Never Been Easier To Be Average

It Has Never Been Easier To Be Average

It has never been easier to be average. This post was written by Jay Acunzo, who will be speaking at the upcoming DrivingSales Executive Summit in Octob…

Lose a Sale, Save a Life: When a Test Drive Tests the Legal DUI Limit at Car Dealerships

Lose a Sale, Save a Life: When a Test Drive Tests the Legal DUI Limit at Car Dealerships

Seasoned car dealers and sales professionals are true masters of relationship marketing.  A vehicle purchase is an important decision for consumers, a…

7 Attitude Tips to help you Succeed in the Car Business

7 Attitude Tips to help you Succeed in the Car Business

I have found that one of the greatest traits of all the best salespeople to ever sell is a positive attitude. I experience it first hand in my own life, …

Industry Insider Alan Ram Passes Away

Industry Insider Alan Ram Passes Away

We here at DrivingSales offer our condolences to the families of those involved. Alan Ram was an industry insider who will be missed by many. Alan Ram, …

LinkedIn Wants Relevancy: Punishes Abusers

linkedinmail.png?width=200

In yet another move by LinkedIn to create a more engaging user experience, the company has decided to penalize any users of the InMail feature that send mail that is irrelevant to the recipient. As LinkedIn cannot read the messages, it had to formulate a way to determine which messages are more likely irrelevant – namely those which receive no replies. LinkedIn used to offer a “guaranteed reply” for its InMail. If the message recipient failed to reply, your account was credited back. In a complete reversal, LinkedIn has now decided those InMail messages which receive no reply are likely to be irrelevant. InMail credits are now returned when your message IS replied to. They are not returned when your message goes unanswered -- the complete opposite of its past policy.

 

As social media networks have continued to grow and compete for users, LinkedIn has added features that make it, for lack of a better analogy, more Facebook-like. It encourages bloggers to publish within the LinkedIn platform, versus sharing content from outside. It nurtures social engagement through its own newsfeed-like feature and within groups. Now it is seeking to eliminate what it has essentially deemed spam. Make no mistake, LinkedIn will still allow anyone to purchase InMail credits – it still wants all of the money it can get. Now, however, the new policy will perhaps force those wishing to send messages to take care to better optimize each message for the recipient. Or they will pay for it – literally.

 

It should certainly motivate senders to give more thought about what message they are sending, and whether the recipient would be interested in it.

Robert Karbaum
Definitely a good move on their part. I hate getting InMail Spam.

 Unlock all of the community & features  Join Now