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Jared Hamilton
From: Jared Hamilton
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Exclusive Blog Posts

Top 6 Things Car Dealers Do To Make Car Buying Difficult

Top 6 Things Car Dealers Do To Make Car Buying Difficult

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R7Y3kZIDVg] Your Turn To Drive discusses Top 6 Things Car Dealers Do To Make Car Buying Difficult.  Jim D…

Choose the correct CRM for your dealership OR pay dearly

Choose the correct CRM for your dealership OR pay dearly

With all the CRMs on the market today, finding the right one for your dealership is becoming more challenging than ever. There have been massive changes in…

5 Benefits of Using Google AdWords Click-to-Message Ad Extensions

5 Benefits of Using Google AdWords Click-to-Message Ad Extensions

Looking for a new way to win over people more likely to send a text message than to call? Set up this free message extension for your text ads on the Googl…

Must-See NADA 100 Expo Displays for Fixed Ops

Must-See NADA 100 Expo Displays for Fixed Ops

New Orleans is ramping up for the 100th anniversary of NADA, and the convention promises to be outstanding. You’ll be entertained at the NADA100 Carn…

Why Social Media Marketers Won’t Replace Your Sales Team

Why Social Media Marketers Won’t Replace Your Sales Team

Social media is changing the marketing profession in remarkable ways. According to the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), the social media analyti…

A Case for Posting a Dozen Tweets a Day as a Business

A Dozen Eggs

“We have a rule at our dealership – no more than 3 social media posts a day. Yes, Twitter is included.”

It’s not a secret. Those who follow me on Twitter know that I post 40-50 times a day. I’m a guy who has been sucked into social media and it works for me. It definitely wouldn’t work for a business. With that said, the infrequent way that the car dealers I monitor handle their Twitter is simply not enough. You need to Tweet more.

The notion that people will unfollow you if you post too much is still a reality… on Facebook. Twitter is different. Because of the way that the feed works in a chronological order rather than based on an algorithm the way Facebook and Google+ do it, each individual Tweet only reaches a tiny fraction of your audience at any given time.  Some say that, depending on the quality of your following, the best that you can expect is still less than 1% per Tweet. That means that if you have 1000 followers, less than 10 people actually see your Tweet.

To Tweet infrequently means that you’re not reaching the audience. To Tweet too much means risking getting unfollowed. The middle ground: a dozen. If you post around a dozen Tweets a day, you’ll find that you can be successful and garner more engagement without making people leave you in droves.

The other challenge when looking at this number is the time necessary to make it happen. A dozen sounds like a lot. Done right, it should only take about 10-20 minutes a day. Here are some tips:

  • Post 3-5 links. They can be to your blog, to a video you released, to industry news, to reviews of your products – the possibilities are limitless.
  • Post 1-3 proactive engagement @. Send a Tweet towards other local businesses, local influencers, and others in the industry.
  • Post pics – no limit here. If you’re a car dealer, you have plenty of things on your lot that can be sent as pictures. The new filter tools on Twitter mobile are excellent. Take advantage of them. Post pictures of cars!
  • Respond accordingly. If you’re only getting a couple of interactions and retweets a day, respond to all of them. If you start getting more interactions, respond to the “manual” ones. Anyone who talks to you directly (in other words, not a retweet) should get a reply from you.
  • Use your other social networks. Some people tie Facebook directly into their Twitter feed. I’m against this for several reasons that I won’t get into now, but you should definitely tie in Pinterest, Tumblr, and other social networks.

The most important thing to remember is to space out the frequency. You’ll run more risk of people unfollowing you by posting three or more Tweets one right after another (other than responses to others) than by posting a dozen a day spread out. Use tools like Buffer or Hootsuite to keep space between your posts.

Twitter is a great tool that so few are really using properly. Differentiate yourself from your competitors by having a vibrant Twitter feed.

Bryan Armstrong
Excellent suggestions and a reminder to know your platform. All Social Media outlets are not created equal and the expectations and tolerance levels vary greatly.
J. Eirn Broveleit
Louie I like this case for more tweets. I think it's quite spot on. I tweeted for a dealership for three years and there are a few things I would add. You shouldn't forget to make sure your tweets are good quality. The amount of tweets is not as important as what you are tweeting about. Potential customers who are on twitter are going to seek you out and look back on your timeline to critique your account. If you can impress them then you'll have yourself a twitter advocate which will come in handy later. So allow yourself more time than 10-20 minutes a day, some time for researching and evaluating various interpretations of your 140. Also it's a good idea to take part in #carchats, especially if your particular car brand is the one hosting it. Reach out to them and encourage them to host some if they are not already. Great work, I look forward to reading more posts from this site!
Eric Miltsch
I'm all for sending multiple tweets out - especially for a dealership account. While managing the Auction Direct account I would tweet dozens of times each day - and they were all manual as well. I shared our blog links, news stories, relevant automotive info, entertaining content, pictures - pictures - pictures - and eventually, this became a standard form of customer service for us. I was fielding tweets from all over the country on the availability of vehicles, customer service topics and yes, even complaints. The point here is you need to be present, you need to respond and you need to be real. The biggest takeaway is the simple fact that the shelf life of a tweet is under 25 minutes. Make it good, get it seen and repeat!

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